A number of weeks ago I helped out friend and fellow photographer aaronbennettphotography on a photo shoot, I went along to document the behind the scenes antics which I truly enjoyed. I took photographs and recorded a number of video clips which Aaron put together to produce a video, you’ll find that in the next post.

These photos are all my own.

The Dream Team:

Photographer: Aaron Bennett

Model: Charlie Simpson

MUA: Miss Deadly Red

naamahdarling:

howtonotsuckatgamedesign:

mirrepp:

Some harsh but very very true words

When people let me review their portfolios (on career day or open days at my game design school) I explicitly ban them from commenting during the review… …because otherwise they will follow the impulse to downplay everything I see in an attempt at being humble."this is an old image…"
"I’m not happy with that one…""this is just a sketch…"
"I did this really quickly…""there is better stuff on later pages…"It’s totally understandable to have those impulses. The quality of art is not empirical data and therefore impossible to measure. Good art, bad art, it all comes down to standards. And you don’t want to come off as naive or self-absorbed.But just don’t do it. Don’t talk yourself down in front of others. In the best case you have someone supportive who now thinks “damn, this person needs to be prepped up all the time. Do I really want to work with somebody like that” or in worst case “now that you say it, yeah, this is kinda lame/rushed/unfinished/lazy, go away.”You can only submit what you have. If that is not enough, then it’s not enough. Your attitude will not change that. But if it is enough, you can do serious harm by not being confident of who you are now.This means appreciating what you are able to do right now and have a clear vision of what you want to learn, be confident that you will learn it in time. Be proud.

This is really important.  Eliminate this urge.  Eliminate it professionally, when having contact with people in a position to buy your work.  Eliminate it socially, when you just share your work for fun.  Destroy this urge as thoroughly as you possibly can.
Because when you have done that, you’ll find that you feel at least 25% less shitty about your own work.  You lose the urge to do it.  You stop reinforcing those negative thoughts, and they retreat.  They may never go away completely (although they might!) but this is good practice for ignoring those thoughts flat-out.
Don’t shit-talk yourself.  Even if you can’t be SO PROUD, don’t ever try to influence anyone’s opinion toward your work in the negative.
Try to love your work.  Try to see what you learned from each piece, even if it’s a failure.  If you feel that you learned nothing, appreciate the fact that just spending time on it is honing your skills and giving you valuable practice.
i used to be super not-confident in my own work.  When I stopped pointing out the flaws in my own stuff, I felt better about it almost immediately.

naamahdarling:

howtonotsuckatgamedesign:

mirrepp:

Some harsh but very very true words

When people let me review their portfolios (on career day or open days at my game design school) I explicitly ban them from commenting during the review… …because otherwise they will follow the impulse to downplay everything I see in an attempt at being humble.

"this is an old image…"

"I’m not happy with that one…"

"this is just a sketch…"

"I did this really quickly…"

"there is better stuff on later pages…"

It’s totally understandable to have those impulses. The quality of art is not empirical data and therefore impossible to measure. Good art, bad art, it all comes down to standards. And you don’t want to come off as naive or self-absorbed.

But just don’t do it. Don’t talk yourself down in front of others. In the best case you have someone supportive who now thinks “damn, this person needs to be prepped up all the time. Do I really want to work with somebody like that” or in worst case “now that you say it, yeah, this is kinda lame/rushed/unfinished/lazy, go away.”

You can only submit what you have. If that is not enough, then it’s not enough. Your attitude will not change that. But if it is enough, you can do serious harm by not being confident of who you are now.

This means appreciating what you are able to do right now and have a clear vision of what you want to learn, be confident that you will learn it in time. 

Be proud.

This is really important.  Eliminate this urge.  Eliminate it professionally, when having contact with people in a position to buy your work.  Eliminate it socially, when you just share your work for fun.  Destroy this urge as thoroughly as you possibly can.

Because when you have done that, you’ll find that you feel at least 25% less shitty about your own work.  You lose the urge to do it.  You stop reinforcing those negative thoughts, and they retreat.  They may never go away completely (although they might!) but this is good practice for ignoring those thoughts flat-out.

Don’t shit-talk yourself.  Even if you can’t be SO PROUD, don’t ever try to influence anyone’s opinion toward your work in the negative.

Try to love your work.  Try to see what you learned from each piece, even if it’s a failure.  If you feel that you learned nothing, appreciate the fact that just spending time on it is honing your skills and giving you valuable practice.

i used to be super not-confident in my own work.  When I stopped pointing out the flaws in my own stuff, I felt better about it almost immediately.

(via litttlerocks)

Note: If you are having issues viewing this video directly from my blog you can still view it here on youtube.

Yesterday I went along to document the yarn bombing of a WWII Tank by Earth, Wool and Fire and Feel Yourself Campaign to raise awareness of breast and testicular cancer.

This is the first video I have ever made from start to finish and I’m really happy with it. I hope you enjoy watching it and go to find out more about those involved.

Yarn bombing of a WWII tank outside Portsmouth’s D-Day Museum for the ‘Feel Yourself’ Campaign to raise awareness for breast and testicular cancer

Squares were donated by people all across the country and put together by an eager team of yarn addicts

The Yarn Bombing will be viewable from 23rd August as part of the Victorious Festival

After the event the yarn will be washed and turned into blankets to donate to homeless veterans

Big thanks to Earth, Wool and Fire for organising the Yarn Bombing and keeping this WWII Tank warm

Music:”Carefree”by Kevin MacLeod at incompetech.com

Production by Billie Rae Photography

Last month I had the joy of attending a workshop run by artist, illustrator and general creative wiz Lou of Ooh La Lapin, The workshop involved creating stuff bunny rabbit toys in the style of Lou, I’ve admire Lou’s work for a while so wasn’t going to pass the chance up to go along and be creative alongside her. Lou asked me to bring my camera along to take some photos and here are the images from the event. I love photographing this kind of event, I enjoy looking for the small details that have been put into it.

Thank you to Lou for running such a wonderful workshop and to Make for allowing it to be hosted in their great venue (they are currently moving to an even bigger site so hopefully I’ll be able to attend more events).

Tate Modern at Night, London

I love the Tate Modern, the building itself is intriguing to walk around and the art work is generally wonderful depending on what you like. On our walk along the Thames we got to the Tate Modern after it was closed but through their lighting it brought attention to areas that normally blend in with the surrounds.

Old Vic Tunnels, London

I finally found the Old Vic Tunnels of London. They are like nothing I’ve seen before and I really enjoyed walking through them, seeing the different kind of people who were attracted there. A few artists were working along one section of the tunnels. I love seeing all artists at work, its great seeing someone’s vision come to life. How they create something that they original saw only in their mind.

Southbank to Embankment to Westminster, London

I took my boyfriend to London for his birthday, we were staying right by the Tower of London so one evening we decided to take a walk along the river Thames. These are a few of the images I took that night. I tried to play with some simplistic shapes as I’d been reading an article in Amateur Photography about photography in cities. They had suggested creating abstract imagery and London at night provides the ideal environment thanks to the various architecture and constant light source.